Robert Brownjohn

Robert Brownjohn (August 8, 1925 – August 1, 1970) was an American graphic designer known for blending formal graphic design concepts with wit and 1960s pop culture. He is best known for his motion picture title sequences, especially From Russia with Love and Goldfinger.

He was born to British parents on August 8, 1925 in Newark, New Jersey, where his father was a bus driver. In 1937, at age 12, his father died. Despite the comparative disinclination of his family, Brownjohn showed early artistic promise. After attending the Pratt Institute in nearby Brooklyn, New York for a year, he earned a place at the Institute of Design in Chicago, Illinois, formerly known as the New Bauhaus by founder László Moholy-Nagy, in 1944.

Regarded as a prodigy by his peers, Brownjohn became a protégé of Moholy-Nagy and his successor, Serge Chermayeff; much of the structural quality in Brownjohn's graphic design can be traced to the former's important influence. In his spare time, he experimented with marijuana and heroin (culminating in an early rehabilitation stint at the behest of Chermayeff) and often frequented the city's jazz clubs with Chermayeff and Buckminster Fuller, then an Institute faculty member. Because of his proclivities, Brownjohn became intimately acquainted with Charlie Parker, Billie Holiday and other musicians of the era.

Robert Brownjohn

Born
1925-08-08)August 8, 1925, Newark, New Jersey
 
Died
August 1, 1970(1970-08-01) (aged 44), London, England
 
Occupation
Graphic designer, title designer